spac30

2CD Set: GVC2030

BC: 827565057351

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gvc
VARIOUS - SNEAKIN' AROUND
THE LONDON RECORDS R&B STORY 1949 -1951
CD1
RUDY RENDER
Sneakin’ Around
The Gal I Love
PAUL BASCOMB
Ain’t Nothin’ Shakin’
What Did Sam Say
ERNIE ANDREWS & THE DRIFTERS
I Didn’t Want To See You Cry Anymore
The Dog, The Cat And Me
DUKE HENDERSON
Mama’s Clock Stopped Tickin
Worried And Blue
PAUL BASCOMB & His Orchestra
Pink Cadillac
Don’t Put My Bizness In The Street
RUDY RENDER
So Many Beautiful Women (And So Little Time)
Will Power
THE TRENIERS with GENE GILBEAUX ORCHESTRA
Everybody Get Together
Why Did You Get So High, Shorty
“SCAT MAN” CROTHERS
Television Blues
I’d Rather Be A Rooster
DUKE HENDERSON
Rock Me In Your Chair
Situation Blues
CD2
ELLIS ‘SLOW’ WALSH
Oklahoma Blues
New Orleans Is My Home
JOE LUTCHER & HIS ORCHESTRA
Cool Down
Jumpin’ At The Mardi Gras
ELLIS ‘SLOW’ WALSH
Sweet Pearline
Don’t Wait ‘Till I Die (To Say You Love Me)
THE KEYS
Shuffle Off To Buffalo
Two Time Mama
The Four Brothers
A Stairway To The Stars
HADDA BROOKS
Hadda’s Boogie
I Hadn’t Anyone Till You
All I Need Is You
The Man With A Horn
Vanity
It Hadda Be Brooks
STICKS McGHEE
Oh What A Face
You Gotta Have Something On The Ball

 

The post war boom in Rhythm & Blues was fuelled partly by the enormous number of rural African Americans who migrated to the big cities like New York, Los Angeles, Detroit and Chicago to work in the industrial plants servicing the war effort. The rise in popularity of this new music had coincided with the forced disbanding of most of the big bands that had ruled both black and white audiences since the mid thirties due to financial constraints placed upon bandleaders. Of course at this time the major purchasers of R&B records were the jukebox operators who placed their machines in bars of urban areas and caught the imagination of workers and partygoers.

The major labels felt the pinch just a little in the fight to get their records on the boxes that generated the most nickels and by 1949 Decca, RCA, Mercury and Columbia all had dedicated R&B divisions and began to compete with their indie rivals. Although several of these major label divisions had their own identities, several like Decca retained the company name but identified their R&B or country series with new catalogue numbering sequences. London Records was one of these labels and although its R&B division had little mainstream success it did record a roster of established artists, and has unlike most of the labels named, never had its repertoire reissued in this way in the CD era.

The vast majority of these titles have never been reissued before even the LP era and are making their CD debut here. This then is the story of one of the unsung outlets for R&B music London Records of America.

dn

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