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2CD Set: RHGB21

BC: 827565058754

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HANK, BRUCE, BERT, JOE, BIG JIM & MORE

....THE UK INSTROSCENE 1956 - 1961

CD1
THE KREW KATS Trambone
THE SCORPIONS (Ghost) Riders In The Sky
THE HUNTERS Teen Scene
THE DRIFTERS Driftin’
RHET STOLLER Chariot
THE TOM CATS Tom Tom Cat
BERT WEEDON Apache
NERO & THE GLADIATORS Hall Of The Mountain King
THE OUTLAWS Ambush
THE FLEE-REKKERS Lone Rider
THE RAVENS ROCK GROUP The Ghoul Friend
JOE BROWN Swagger
THE BARONS Whirlwind
ERNIE SHEAR WITH THE LEW RANDALL BAND Cannonball
THE JETSTREAMS Bongo Rock
THE APEX GROUP Yorkshire Relish
THE CANNONS I Didn’t Know The Gun Was Loaded
JOHNNY GREGORY & HIS ORCH A Thunder Of Drums
THE PACKABEATS Gypsy Beat
JUDD PROCTOR Clearway
THE WERLWINDS Winding It Up
THE CHECKMATES Caravan
MAX HARRIS Gurney Slade Theme
THE SNEAKY PETES The Savage (Part 2)
THE KREW KATS Samovar
LORD ROCKINGHAM’S XI Fried Onions
THE VIGILANTES Man In Space
PETER JAY & THE JAYWALKERS Mistral
JOHNNY ‘THE GASH’ GRAY WITH KEN JONES & HIS ORCH Tequila
THE RUSTLERS High Strung

CD2
THE MOONTREKKERS Night Of The Vampire
THE HUNTERS The Storm
THE FABULOUS FLEE-RAKKERS Green Jeans
CHICO ARNEZ & HIS ORCH Yashmak
THE TED TAYLOR FOUR Cats Eyes
THE SHADOWS Man Of Mystery
THE KREW KATS Peak Hour
JOE BROWN The Switch
THE SCORPIONS Scorpio
BERT WEEDON Guitar Boogie Shuffle
THE PETE CHESTER GROUP Three Old Maids
THE OUTLAWS Swingin’ Low
THE CHECKMATES Yep!
THE VAMPIRES Clap Trap
THE BARONS Samurai
THE STACCATOS Main Line
KEN MACKINTOSH & HIS ORCH Raunchy
REX & THE MINORS Chicken Sax
NERO & THE GLADIATORS Entry Of The Gladiators
THE VOLCANOS Theme From Tightrope
DAVID EDE Last Night
ARTHUR GREENSLADE & THE GEE-MEN Eclipse
GEORGE CHISHOLM & THE BLUENOTES ft. BERT WEEDON Honky Tonk
TOMMY STEELE & JOE BROWN Drunken Guitar
THE JEFF ROWENA GROUP Bullfight
LORD ROCKINGHAM’S XI Hoots Mon
THE DRIFTERS Jet Black
THE RED PRICE COMBO Theme From Danger Man
THE IKONS Rio Grande
THE PLANETS Jam Roll
CHERRY WAINER Cerveza
THE JOHN BARRY SEVEN Beat Girl (Main Title Theme)

The “Golden Age” of the UK R’n’R/Beat Instrumental occurred between the late 50s and the very early 60s, peaking in 1961 on the back of The Shadows’ monumental breakthrough the previous year with the chart-topping ‘Apache’. Indeed, more than half the sides featured on this compilation were recorded in ’61, many of them in fairly straightforward attempts to copy The Shads’ irresistibly twangy sound and style.


Instrumental music had, of course, always been hugely popular, long before the arrival of Rock’n’Roll - and here in the UK we’d boasted our own quaint array of favourites, ranging from pianist Winifred Atwell to trumpeter Eddie Calvert, not to mention an ill-assorted selection of Dance Bands and Jazz combos. But by the mid-50s, as ballroom dancing gave way to jiving, more strident, beatier instrumental styles began to emerge. American hits of the era were of course routinely covered, so we had Anglified versions of numbers like ‘Honky Tonk’, ‘Raunchy’, ‘Tequila’ and ‘Cerveza’, care of George Chisholm & Bert Weedon, Ken Mackintosh, Johnny ‘The Gash’ Gray & Ken Jones, and Cherry Wainer respectively. We even managed to squeeze out a few home-grown goodies, most notably Lord Rockingham’s XI’s ‘Fried Onions’ (recently revived in a TV commercial) and the chart-topping ‘Hoots Mon’.


Initially, the tenor sax had been the dominant musical feature, but as R’n’R and Rockabilly began to flourish the guitar gradually took over as the genre’s de facto ‘lead instrument’, and so guitar-driven Instros began to emerge. By this stage we’d had the Skiffle boom in the UK which meant that there was already an entire generation of guitar-toting teenagers standing idly around, wondering what to do next. And so when twangier records began to turn up in the UK, there was a ready-made cast of would-be twangers, all primed to copy them. Ironically, the first British guitarist to make the UK charts was ‘old timer’ Bert Weedon, whose cover of The Virtues’ ‘Guitar Boogie Shuffle’ made the Top 10 in the Summer of ’59. Another ‘old school’ session man was Ernie Shear, whose playing on Cliff & The Drifter’s ‘Move It!’ more or less guaranteed his immortality. Although Ernie never pursued a solo career, his version of ‘Cannonball’ was one of the earliest Duane Eddy covers. Mention of The Drifters brings us to messrs Hank B. Marvin, Bruce Welch, Jet Harris and Tony Meehan, whose ‘Jet Black’/‘Driftin’’, served to introduce what would become the celebrated “Shads’ Sound”.

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RockHistory.co.uk is an on-going historical project to record the background stories and the anecdotes from the people who participated in greatest British musical explosion that started back in the 1950s and that went on to reverberate right round the world. Tales about the origins of the songs, the roots of the groups and the front of the performers. These CD releases are part of a series of multi-media release that are all linked via the www.RockHistory.co.uk

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