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2CD Set: RHGB33

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LIP GLOSS, EYELINER & HAIRSPRAY
Early Brit Girls Vol. 3

Disc One
HELEN SHAPIRO • Sometime Yesterday
JAN BURNNETTE • ’Til I Hear The Truth From You
PATTI LYNN • Johnny Angel
CAROL DEENE • Let Me Do It My Way
JACKIE TRENT • The One Who Really Loves You
CHRISTINE QUAITE • Your Nose Is Gonna Grow
JENNY MOSS • Hobbies
PAMELA BLUE • My Friend Bobby
GRAZINA • Another Like You
LOUISE CORDET • Crazy Kind Of Love
SUZIE COPE • Biggity Big
WENDY RICHARD & DIANA BERRY • Keep ’Em Looking Around
VERNONS GIRLS • I’m Gonna Let My Hair Down
LORRAE DESMOND • Blue Blue Day
LANA SISTERS • Down South
SPRINGFIELDS • Little By Little
HELEN SHAPIRO • Will You Love Me Tomorrow
SHEILA BUXTON • Sixteen Reasons
MAUREEN EVANS • Tomorrow Is Another Day
ALMA COGAN • Dream Talk
BARBARA WINDSOR • Sparrows Can’t Sing
ANNE SHELTON • Seven Days
THREE BARRY SISTERS • I-Ay Ove-Lay Oo-Yay
LORNE LESLEY • Bloodshot Eyes
JOAN REGAN • Love Me To Pieces
ANNETTE KLOOGER • Tra La La
SUSAN SINGER • Johnny Summertime
PETULA CLARK • Cinderella Jones
SIMONE JACKSON • Ain’t Gonna Kiss Ya
JULIE GRANT • Count On Me
DONNA DOUGLAS • He’s So Near
CAROL DEENE • Growin’ Up
KATHY KIRBY • Dance On
YANA • Climb Up The Wal

Disc Two
CAROL DEENE • Some People
ALMA COGAN • The Train Of Love
SUSAN MAUGHAN • Baby Doll Twist
HELEN SHAPIRO • Cry My Heart Out
MAUREEN EVANS • The Big Hurt
JULIE GRANT • Then Only Then
BEVERLEY SISTERS • Green Fields
PETULA CLARK • Where Do I Go From Here
MARION RYAN • Love Me Forever
BILLIE ANTHONY • You
JO SHELTON • I Need Your Arms Around Me
STEVIE MARSH • If You Were The Only Boy in The World
JAN BURNNETTE • Fool In Love
ROSE BRENNAN • Johnny Let Me Go
HAYLEY MILLS • Jeepers Creepers
CHRISTINE QUAITE • Our Last Chance
SUZY COPE • Kisses And Tears
VALERIE MOUNTAIN • Yes You Did
HELEN SHAPIRO • Little Devil
SPRINGFIELDS • Breakaway
SHIRLEY ANN FIELD • It’s Legal
SUSAN SINGER • Bobby’s Lovin’ Touch
GRAZINA • Don’t Be Shy
GUNILLA THORNE • Merry-Go-Round
VERNONS GIRLS • Mama Doesn’t Know
DO & DENA FARRELL • New Love Tonight
LITA ROZA • Mama (He Treats Your Daughter Mean)
CHERRY WAINER • Itchy Twitchy Feeling
LORRAE DESMOND • Ding Dong Rock-A-Billy Wedding
JOAN SAVAGE • Hello Happiness Goodbye Blues
KATHY KIRBY • Playboy
LANA SISTERS • Tintarella Di Luna
SHIRLEY BASSEY • Kiss Me, Honey Honey, Kiss Me
PAT PHOENIX • The Rovers Chorus

Like its predecessors, Bouffants, Beehives & Backcombing - Early Brit Girls Vol.1 (RHGB 25) and Helen, Dusty, Susan, Carol & More - Early Brit Girls Vol.2 (RHGB 31), this compilation chronicles the rise of UK gals from the R&R era to the early 60s, heralding the newly emergent Brit Girl sound at the dawn of the Beat era. As we have learned, although the 60s ‘dolly bird’ was still a couple of years away, shortly after the turn of that decade a whole ‘new look’ Brit Girl had begun to emerge… a slim, wide-eyed young gamine, pretty much the polar opposite of the fiercely glam, severely painted, carefully-coiffed songstress who’d graced the UK’s hit parades of the 50s. Indeed, during the 60s, many of the ‘old guard’ underwent makeovers, with the result that even deeply ensconced establishment figures like Alma Cogan, Petula Clark, Marion Ryan and Shirley Bassey began to look younger than their mothers for the first time since reaching puberty. And, of course, the newcomers to the scene continued to bring entirely fresh looks and sounds to the party…

Although fourteen-year old Helen Shapiro was by no means the first British girl singer to top the UK charts - there can be no real doubt that her explosive arrival on the Pop scene, in 1961, marked a major turning point. Whilst her predecessors had all made the No.1 spot with records that frankly sounded as though they might have been recorded back in the 40s (or even earlier!), Helen’s discs were entirely of their era. Her biggest hits can be found elsewhere in this series she is represented here by a couple of popular LP tracks and a pair of B-sides. Of that old guard, Petula Clark proved to be the most enduring, regularly reinventing herself over the decades - indeed, she still continues to cut albums and play concerts, although now in her eighties. Both ‘Where Do I Go From Here’ and ‘Cinderella Jones’ were significant European hits for Pet, the former an early Joe Meek production. Had Alma Cogan not died so tragically young (from cancer, in 1966, at the age of thirty-four), there seems no real doubt that she would have gone on to rival Petula in terms of success and career longevity. In 1960, Alma registered with covers of Herb & Betty Warner’s ‘Dream Talk’ (fighting off rival versions by Michael Holliday and Shirley Douglas) and Paul Anka’s much-travelled ‘Train Of Love’, an US hit for Annette, also covered in the UK by The Lindy’s.

Further notable competitors in the ‘Career Longevity Stakes’ were the incomparable Shirley Bassey, DBE - although ironically, she has made few concessions to changing musical styles over the past sixty years (‘Kiss Me, Honey Honey, Kiss Me’ was perhaps her most uptempo hit) - and the mighty Beverley Sisters, who predate even Pet Clark. Yet despite their enormous popularity, in a career which stretches way back to the early 1940s and saw them still performing in the 21st Century, The Bevs enjoyed surprisingly patchy record success. Their cover of The Brothers Four’s ‘Green Fields’ proved to be their last chart entry, in 1960. Elsewhere, old-timers like Anne Shelton (with Clyde McPhatter’s ‘Seven Days’), Marion Ryan (whose cover of The Four Esquires’ ‘Love Me Forever’ was her biggest hit), Stevie Marsh (who charted very briefly with her revival of ‘The Only Boy In The World’) and Lita Roza (with a surprisingly valid reading of Ruth Brown’s ‘Mama (He Treats Your Daughter Mean)’) also continued to weigh in with the occasional goodie. Anne’s younger sister, Jo Shelton, was extremely unfortunate not to enjoy much in the way of commercial solo success, as were a number other former danceband singers, including Billie Anthony, Rose Brennan, Joan Savage and particularly Yana, whose ‘Climb Up The Wall’ remains one of the great “lost” classics of the 50s

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RockHistory.co.uk is an on-going historical project to record the background stories and the anecdotes from the people who participated in greatest British musical explosion that started back in the 1950s and that went on to reverberate right round the world. Tales about the origins of the songs, the roots of the groups and the front of the performers. These CD releases are part of a series of multi-media release that are all linked via the www.RockHistory.co.uk

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