spac36

2CD Set: RHGB36

827565060696

 

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LIKE I DO
GREAT BRITISH RECORD LABELS - ORIOLE

Disc One
1 MAUREEN EVANS Like I Do
2 JOHNNY CLIVE Sue
3 THE DOWLANDS Break Ups
4 TERRY DENE Next Stop Paradise
5 TONY SHEVETON Lullabye Of Love
6 DEEK RIVERS The Outsider
7 RAY PILGRIM Red Red Roses
8 THE DAY BROTHERS Angel
9 BRIAN WESKE In The Midst Of A Crowd
10 SUSAN SINGER Lock Your Heart Away
11 THUNDERCLAP JONES Sound Barrier Boogie
12 NANCY WHISKEY & HER SKIFFLE GROUP Ella Speed
13 HALLELUJAH SKIFFLE GROUP ft. CLINTON FORD I Saw The Light
14 CHAS McDEVITT SKIFFLE GROUP Sporting Life
15 THE TED TAYLOR FOUR Haunted Pad
16 ALAN KLEIN Striped Purple Shirt
17 GERRY BECKLES Come Back Running
18 SHIRLEY DOUGLAS with CHAS McDEVITT GROUP Real Love
19 RUSS HAMILTON Rainbow
20 JACKIE LEE End Of The World
21 JAN BURNNETTE Fool In Love
22 DICK JORDAN Sandy
23 VERN ROGERS One Way Love Affair
24 TONY SHEVETON A Lonely Heart
25 BRIAN WESKE 24 Hours A Day
26 THE RAINDROPS Let’s Make A Foursome
27 MAUREEN EVANS Time And Time Again
28 RAY PILGRIM with THE TED TAYLOR FOUR Granada
29 THE DOWLANDS Julie
30 THE GARY EDWARDS COMBO Franz Liszt Twist
31 THE MIKE SAMMES SINGERS Oh My Twisted Bach
32 ALAN KLEIN You Gave Me The Blues
33 THE TOTNAMITES Spurs Song
34 CHAS McDEVITT SKIFFLE GROUP ft. NANCY WHISKEY Freight Train

Disc Two
1 RUSS HAMILTON We Will Make Love
2 THE DOWLANDS A Love Like Ours
3 THE TED TAYLOR FOUR Son Of Honky Tonk
4 TERRY DENE Geraldine
5 TONY SHEVETON I Have A Feeling
6 ALAN KLEIN Danger Ahead!
7 THE JEFF ROWENA FIVE Diddle-De-Dum
8 SUSAN SINGER Hello First Love
9 GARY MILLS Big Story Breaking
10 DICK JORDAN Hallelujah I Love Her So
11 MAUREEN EVANS Acapulco Mexico
12 FRANK WEIR & HIS ORCHESTRA El Curaca
13 JOHNNY WORTH Nightmare
14 THE GARY EDWARDS COMBO The Method
15 CHAS McDEVITT SKIFFLE GROUP I’m Satisfied
16 CLINTON FORD Too Many Beautiful Girls
17 THE BARONS Summertime
18 VERN ROGERS That Ain’t Right
19 THE MIKE SAMMES SINGERS All Of A Twist
20 REY ANTON How Long Can This Last
21 RUSS HAMILTON Wedding Ring
22 ALAN KLEIN Three Coins In A Sewer
23 JACKIE LEE & THE RAINDROPS (I Was The) Last One To Know
24 CHRISTINE QUAITE Our Last Chance
25 TONY SHEVETON Foolish Doubts
26 JACKIE TRENT Pick Up The Pieces
27 DICK JORDAN Little Christine
28 RAY PILGRIM Little Miss Make Believe
29 MAUREEN EVANS Paper Roses
30 LONNIE DONEGAN The Passing Stranger
31 BRIAN WESKE Where Does The Clown Go
32 CHAS McDEVITT SKIFFLE GROUP ft. NANCY WHISKEY Greenback Dollar
33 EDRIC CONNOR Manchester United Calypso

Oriole Records’ somewhat convoluted history began in the mid 1920s, which actually makes them one of the UK’s earliest record labels, although they had periods of inactivity during the 30s and 40s. They were entirely unrelated to the American Oriole label.


Oriole’s roots can be traced back to Levy’s Record Shop, which was founded by Morris’s father in Whitechapel in the early 1920s. In addition to gramophones and gramophone records, the store sold sewing machines (and hired out bicycles), whilst also doubling as an importer and distributor, bringing highly-prized Jazz 78s in from the United States and Europe. In 1925, the increasing demand for Jazz 78s led to the launch of the shortlived Levaphone record label, which issued a handful of US “Race Records” licensed from Vocalion and Pathe. The label was discontinued in 1927 and immediately replaced by Oriole, which continued to release Vocalion repertoire. Following a brief period of inactivity Oriole returned in the early 30s with a series of their own UK Hot Jazz recordings, which were in turn followed by
a handful of French Jazz releases a couple of years later.


By now, Levys had their own recording studio - Levys Sound Studios - in Regent Street which moved to bigger premises in New Bond Street later in the decade. At this stage they were operating primarly as custom recording and manufacturing operation. The studio side of the family business was managed by Jacques Levy, whilst his aforementioned brother, Morris, handled admin, promo, marketing and label management.


The Oriole imprint was resurrected again in 1950, initially with a series of UK and European Jazz 78s, which were soon augmented by licensed-in recordings from the American Mercury label. The same year they opened their own state-of-the-art pressing plant and warehouse in Aston Clinton, Buckinghamshire, and they soon began to get ‘overspill’ pressing work from the bigger, established British record companies. Meanwhile, their deal with Mercury provided success with releases by artists like Frankie Laine, Patti Page, Georgia Gibbs, Vic Damone and Billy Daniels, and by the mid 50s Oriole were actively recording home-grown artists in search of their own hits.


Another record label which is indelibly linked to Oriole is, of course, their budget line, Embassy, which was sold exclusively through the Woolworths chain of stores. Embassy debuted towards the end of 1954, and their modus operandi remained the same for the next ten years, viz: double A-sided cover versions of the hits of the day, which sold at around half-a-crown cheaper than regular 78s/45s. It’s
likely that Embassy was more profitable than Oriole, as many of their releases - notably in the R&R era - sold in their tens of thousands.


The arrival of R&R and Skiffle in the UK during 1956 changed everything, of course, and alongside their staple diet of danceband and musical hall fare, Oriole began to sneak out a few releases aimed squarely at the new, young teenage market. Certainly, Thunderclap Jones’ pounding ‘Sound Barrier Boogie’ possessed all the energy and drive of R&R, and although Lonnie Donegan’s gentle ‘The Passing Stranger’ was hardly representative of his Skiffle repertoire (it was, in fact, an older recording, from the 1954 film of the same title), its very release served as an indicator that they had their finger on the pulse.

Indeed, when Oriole hit the jackpot with an UK recording it was with a bonà-fidé Skiffle classic, ‘Freight Train’, by The Chas McDevitt Skiffle Group featuring Nancy Whiskey. It promptly made the UK Top 5 and in a wholly unlikely scenario also made the US Top 40, leading to their touring the US (where they appeared on the prestigious Ed Sullivan Show) and ultimately taking worldwide sales of the disc to well over a million. But ironically, Nancy didn’t much like Skiffle and quit the group after their second hit, ‘Greenback Dollar’; sadly, neither she nor Chas were destined to taste chart glory again.

Meanwhile, Oriole had scored an even bigger success with scouser Russ Hamilton, the Butlins’ redcoat who reached No.2 in the UK with his selfpenned ‘We Will Make Love’. This, in itself would have been impressive; but the disc was issued in the US, where an enterprising DJ flipped it and began playing the B-side, ‘Rainbow’, which subsequently climbed to No.4. Although his follow-up, ‘Wedding Ring’, also made the UK Top 20, he was never quite able to sustain a career.....

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RockHistory.co.uk is an on-going historical project to record the background stories and the anecdotes from the people who participated in greatest British musical explosion that started back in the 1950s and that went on to reverberate right round the world. Tales about the origins of the songs, the roots of the groups and the front of the performers. These CD releases are part of a series of multi-media release that are all linked via the www.RockHistory.co.uk

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